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Tag Archives: Drywall

It's been one of those days.

Yes, I did say a few of those words.  Mill marks in
this drywall set the scene for a twisted, chaotic
kind of horror.  I am glad it broke before I got
out on the high plank, much higher and longer
than the one you can see beyond me in the
photo.  Those planks have a tendency to bounce
when you walk on them.  I so hate falling from
high places and blowing out my knee or breaking
bones, because regardless I have to continue
working.  I like to get paid so there is no room
for pain.

I can just imagine the headline, “Wife Breaks
Husband’s Neck After Breaking His Fall.”

At one time acoustic ceilings were quite
fashionable in homes.  It was a way to cover
over horrible drywall jobs, or drywall that
could not hide poorly constructed ceilings.
Acoustic is now refered to as “popcorn” with
tremendous scorn and for very sound reasons.
Popcorn ceilings are difficult to paint,
impossible to clean, and they absorb hideous
odors like a sponge.  Acoustic can therefor
decrease the value of your home by thousands
of dollars.  In todays difficult market it can
make a house impossible to sell.

There is an extraordinary dilemma in how to
eliminate that popcorn with professional results.
Not only is it hard to remove, but the ceiling will
look hideous afterward. 

Popcorn ceilings should not only be removed by
professionals, but repaired by them as well.  The
sheetrock, over time, begins to loosen and sag. 
This is a disaster and will have to be tightened.
Left over mastic from the old acoustic texture
will have to be re-bonded with primer.  Once
repairs are made, the entire ceiling has to be
skimmed smooth with at least two coats of mud.
Finally the ceiling will need a new texture to
match the walls.

With all of this in mind, make certain you retain
a trustworthy professional drywaller to do the
job.

Acoustic or Popcorn.

 

Copyright 2010, by Glenn Raymond.

     This is a matter of personal opinion based
on my 50 years of hands on experience.  That
old nemesis of mine, known as spackling may
have some type of legitimate uses, but not
necessarily in drywall repairs.

     The best way to patch small holes in your
drywall is with basic drywall compound (mud).
This magic compound can be purchased at most
major home repair suppliers and lumberyards.
Remeber, when it is pre-mixed, it still needs to
have a little water added and then mixed again
to remove all the lumps.  Mud shrinks as it dries,
so you may need to apply 2 or 3 layers, alowing
it to dry between each coat.

     There are also fast setting powdered products
you mix with water.  These work very well, but
set up quickly.  You will want to wash your tools
and hands right away.  Once it sets up, it is a bit
tricky to remove.

     Spackling simply does not give professional
results, and you don’t want to devalue your
home.  Working with mud will be far more
rewarding in the end.